Christine Clifford, CSP is a pioneer in the field of therapeutic humor, particularly as it relates to coping with cancer. Her ground-breaking book Not Now... I'm Having a No Hair Day! won numerous awards and is still sought after by reporters and media sources worldwide. Christine has been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Entrepreneur magazine, MORE, Self, Golf Digest, Better Homes & Gardens as well as sources half way around the world such as The Singapore Women's Weekly and The Hindu in India. Christine will glady provide interviews for all media and is happy to help you promote your event. Don't forget to laugh! TM

 

THE PULSE: Hysterectomy Truths with Jodi Davis, Christine Clifford, and Kay Kedding

Jul-21-13
Jodi Davis, Christine Clifford and Kay Kedding have experienced the ups and downs of a hysterectomy – removal of the uterus – but all three women endured the experience for different reasons.

“Staying Mentally Strong in the Face of Cancer” The Mesothelioma Cancer Blog

Feb-18-13
A cancer diagnosis is not only extremely physically demanding for a person as they begin treatment; a diagnosis is also very challenging mentally as well. For a patient beginning their journey through their disease, 20+ year cancer survivor, author, and CEO and President of The Cancer Club, Christine Clifford provides 9 tips to stay mentally and emotionally strong.

“How Did Christine Clifford Find Humor in Her Cancer Experience?” Holistic Health Show with Dr. Carl Helvie

Feb-04-13
Holistic Health Show with Dr. Carl Helvie, BBS Radio, January 30, 2013

“Cancer’s Funny?” Chicago Tribune

Nov-07-12
An increasing number of comedians — and ordinary people — are laughing openly at the ironies and indignities of life with the disease. Not long after she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1994, Christine Clifford walked into her local Barnes and Noble with a simple request: "I'd like to see all of your humorous books about cancer."

Cancer Humorist Speaks to Record Audience at Women’s Night Out October 2012

Oct-13-12
The 2012 annual Tri-County Health Care (TCHC) Women’s Night Out saw record attendance Monday evening, with free screenings, a doctors’ panel and speaker Christine Clifford at Wadena Memorial Auditorium addressing the topic of humor to get through life’s adversities.

Celebration of Life Survivor’s Party

Oct-11-12
In a way, breast cancer changed Christine Clifford’s life for the better. Just 19 years old when her mother lost her battle with the disease at age 42, Clifford found a lump in her breast during a routine self-examination that led to her own diagnosis when she was 40. “My kids were 10 and 8 at the time, and I thought, ‘oh my gosh, I’m going to go the way of my mom. I’m going to crawl in bed and die,’” she said. “And lo and behold, I found humor in my situation.”

Cancer Fighters Thrive Magazine, “Laugh ‘ Til It Heals”, Summer, 2012

Jun-05-12
Cancer is a laughing matter? who knew? When I was diagnosed with stage III metastatic breast cancer 18 years ago, laughter was the last thing on my mind. Yet immediately I witnessed a phenomenon: when friends and family learned I had cancer, they didn’t know what to say.

Bounce Back to Your Brilliance! – Laugh ‘til It Heals

May-29-12
We’ve all heard the saying, “laughter is the best medicine” and wondered how that is possible? Author of Laugh ‘til It Heals: Notes Form the World’s Funniest Cancer Mailbox, Christine Clifford, and Founder of The Cancer Club shares how laughter got her through breast cancer and how it can help you and your loved ones too.

M.O. What's Yours? interviews Christine Clifford

Apr-04-12
I realized when I was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1994, that humor was a great connector of people. And I didn't want to face my journey alone. I wanted support and people to surround me.

The Nursing News, U.K. Book Review for Laugh ' Til It Heals

Mar-05-12
This little book aims to remind us that humour can be a great healer, and just because you, or a friend or relative, has cancer, you can and should retain a sense of humour. The worst possible thing to do around people with cancer is to talk in hushed tones, look sad, avoid talking about illness and pretend that there is nothing wrong.
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